Demi Lovato Reveals the ‘Final Intervention’ That Got Her Sober

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It’s been over five years since Demi Lovato got sober. And like many addicts, the moment she finally decided to address her alcohol and drug abuse came when she hit “rock bottom.”

The 25-year-old singer opened up about about her dark days during an appearance on The Jonathan Ross Show airing Saturday — confessing that while her family and friends had staged a few interventions over the years, they didn’t have an impact until they finally told the star they were abandoning her.

“The final one, everyone was like, ‘We are no longer going to leave, we are leaving,’ ” Lovato recalled. “That was the moment when I thought, ‘Okay, I really need to get help and get sober.’ This time I knew… I had hit rock bottom and I just needed to do this for myself.”

Lovato went on to explain that her parents had gone so far as to ban the former Disney Channel star from seeing her little sister Madison De La Garza, now 15.

Madison De La Garza and Demi Lovato in 2011
Alberto E. Rodriguez/

“I knew that I had a lot of life ahead of me but one of the main reasons of getting sober was so that I could be around my little sister because my mom and dad [said I couldn’t be around her] if I was doing stuff.”

That tough love paid off, and now Lovato is hoping her experiences helps others going through similar battles.

“I went through some tough times and went to treatment for some struggles that I had and now I’ve come out the other side,” the “Sorry Not Sorry” singer said. “I use my stories to help others and inspire them to get the help they need.”

“I had family and really close friends and my manager, they all were by my side through everything,” she continued. “I wouldn’t be here without them. My fans too, I feel they gave me a reason to live and I’m forever grateful.”

Brian J Ritchie/Hotsauce/REX/Shutterstock

RELATED VIDEO: Demi Lovato Opens Up About Her Sobriety: ‘Every Day Is a Battle’

Lovato has been vocal about her mental health and her struggles with addiction, cutting and eating disorders since being diagnosed with bipolar disorder while receiving inpatient treatment in 2011.

Earlier this month, Lovoto admitted that her sobriety is something that she works on “every single day” while receiving the Spirit of Sobriety award at the annual Brent Shapiro Foundation for Drug Prevention Summer Spectacular in Beverly Hills.

“Every day is a battle,” she said. “You just have to take it one day at a time, some days are easier than others and some days you forget about drinking and using, but for me, I work on my physical health, which is important, but my mental health as well.”

“I see a therapist twice a week,” she added about her continued recovery. “I make sure I stay on my medications. I go to AA meetings. I do what I can physically in the gym. I make it a priority.”

Vivien Killilea/ for The Brent Shapiro Foundation

Later, when talking to PEOPLE, Lovoto again reinforced why she wanted to be open about her journey.

“When I went to rehab, my manager said you know, ‘You can either keep this private or you can share this with the world, and hopefully, someone can learn from your struggles,’ ” Lovato remembered. “And when I heard that I thought, ‘I think it’s more important that people learn from my struggles than to keep it to myself.’ ”



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